Virtual Reality vs. Virtual Currency

The tech battle no one is discussing, because in the end, neither will win.

rdacouchtalk4

In 2015, Oculus Rift was supposed to be the beginning of the VR revolution, it wasn’t. In 2016, Samsung Gear VR was supposed to be the beginning of the VR revolution, it wasn’t. In 2017, Playstation VR was supposed to be the beginning of the VR revolution, it wasn’t.

With hundreds of VR games available, VR ready social and building platforms like Sansar and High Fidelity ready for open beta use, and billions of dollars invested in what everyone calls the next big thing, it is rather disappointing that it is not happening. Thanks to a likely big blockbuster in Ready Player One coming to theaters in March, maybe 2018 will finally be the year.

ready player1

Or not! There are plenty of reasons why VR has not become mainstream. The biggest is the bulky helmets you have to wear, and that most people experience dizzyness or nausea after only about 20 minutes of use. There is a great fix for this last issue that hasn’t been implemented enough: Virtual noses.

But, the biggest challenge to VR mainstream continues to be cost. You can spend $900 for a Samsung Galaxy 8 and Samsung VR headset, or you can spend about the same amount for a Playstation 4 and a Playstation VR bundle. If you want to do VR on your PC, you need around $1400.  That’s $400 for recently reduced price the Oculus Rift, and a $1000 required video card.

tumblr_p2xmqjw78h1qapm0ao1_1280

When did it cost $1000 for a video card?

Why are video cards so expensive? One word: “Bitcoin”.  Virtual currencies like Bitcoin have skyrocketed in price over the last year, so much that it is worth building your own computer to “mine” number combinations that fit the fairly simple formula required to create a new Bitcoin (and if you find a combo, you get to keep it). Regular PC processors are not powerful enough to efficiently “mine”, but graphics cards are.

According to sources, one graphics card can “mine” around $5 to $10 worth of virtual currency a day, though the best strategy is concentrate on the small lesser known currencies, as too many other resources are being used to mine the expensive ones. This means your $1000 graphics card will pay for itself in about 4 months, assuming prices stay high enough. But before you invest, consider that you will need a 500W power supply that has to run 24 hours a day, so expect to lose on your electricity bills, too.

The recent trend is that virtual currencies are declining in value, losing half their value in the last two months. If it continues to decline, you won’t make enough to pay for the electricity. Maybe then video cards will come down in price.

My prediction: Both will fail

Despite being friends with both VR pioneers and crypto currency advocates, I have to take the rational position that they are both doomed to fail.  VR is the next Kinect, WiiU, 3D TV, or many other trendy “cool” techs that ultimately failed.  Crypto-currencies are riding a bubble like “Tulip Mania”.

Advocates of both will insist that they have heard these criticisms before, and my answer is “because they are valid”.

I might invest in VR gear if the price comes down to a decent level. In the mean time, I’m using my graphics card for gaming and 3D rendering.

 

5 thoughts on “Virtual Reality vs. Virtual Currency

  1. wayward4now January 23, 2018 / 4:58 am

    I’ve been trying to play with HiFi but it requires I use a $700 video card, plus the expensive headgear. To heck with that. Plus, it seems to be mostly Windows based, so Linux is in their back seat. So, I’m not very enthused. Funny, when Hifi was first in beta, it worked just fine. I can run an OpenSim server easy peasy. Bitcoin will bite everyone in the ass later, so there ya go.
    Ric

  2. wayward4now January 23, 2018 / 5:01 am

    What I really want is scaled down IMAX setup. THAT would be as good as it gets.

  3. Skeptisk January 23, 2018 / 5:08 am

    I hope the crypto-currencies fail. Eg., China doesn’t accept such things, and with one swoop around 1 billion people are cut off from Bitcoin. Besides, Samsung is ramping up production so to speak, so the prices will eventually fall. With a combination, the prices might even be cheaper than it was before the Bitcoin-craze.

    And VR cannot succeed, as you can’t fake your vestibular system, and you will always get motion-sickness. The same applies to astronauts, as your brain can’t process up or down, because there’s no up or down!! That’s why they have to be trained extensively before launch, and if average Joe needs extensive training to get rid of motion-sickness, then that alone will be more expensive than any graphics-card.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.